MILES DAVIS 1926~1991:DEWEY@90


posted by Robert J. Carmack  #blues2jazzguy

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Miles always extremely fashionable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Miles Dewey Davis  jazz musician,composer, and fashion setting artist turned 90 years old today. if he was still alive today ,what Miles would we see or hear from ?What would he think of the music scene, not necessarily jazz, but the whole Pop culture.  Certainly, in my opinion, he would be shocked and appalled at the really low-quality of so-called talent being “worshipped and awarded all the benefits.

Miles was one of my favorite jazz artists and more importantly, He was an inspiration to me as a young budding saxophonist in the early and mid -1960s. Fortunate for me, I got an opportunity to check out Miles for myself “Live” at the Pacific Jazz Festival held at the Orange County Fairgrounds in fall of 1966. I was much too young to have witnessed his first great quintet consisting of Red Garland,Paul Chambers,Philly Joe Jones, John Coltrane almost a decade before.  I was quite impressed as a 11th grade student to actually attend a festival with such a stellar lineup for that particular night the Davis Quintet were headlining. In addition to Davis performing was The Duke Ellington Orchestra, The Dave Brubeck Quartet and Brazilian guitarist, Bola Sete. The Davis group had the highly sought-after  Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter,Ron Carter and the very young Tony Williams with him. After that experience, I bought every album I could on the sidemen and Davis, as I was surely “hooked”. By the end of the decade,circa 1968 and 1969, Miles was changing up his whole approach from full acoustical jazz with further explorations of modes. But, he seemed more interested in exploring the hip, “Electric sounds” of Pop/Rock groups of the day .

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Miles watching Howard McGhee

I never saw Miles again Live until one night at Shelly’s Manne Hole in 1971, with a completely revamped band consisting of  Keith Jarrett electric keyboards and Jack De’Johnette on drums ,both recent alums from the Charles Lloyd group.also Michael Henderson electric bass and Gary Bartz on saxes.  At this time Miles was promoting his new all-electric band and album “Jack Johnson” which was a cornucopia of electric keyboards, organs ,electric bass with sound enhancing devices, including Miles Davis himself trying to get through the evening without shocking himself to death with this new “Electric Trumpet equipped with wah-wah pedal and an installed mic pickup near the neck and mouthpiece. Whenever Miles would get into a groove, the trumpet would shock him because of the buildup of “Spittle” and the metallic aspects of the trumpet. He practically spent the entire evening coating his lips with a special oil, and jumping in pain whenever it would shock him. I was seated right in front of Miles less than five feet away. I enjoyed the new band overall, but it was annoying watching Miles uncomfortably play his trumpet. I felt like it was a lot to sacrifice just to produce a sound, but this was the determination and resolve of a great musician and pioneer to carry on until the ability to play the trumpet was not impeded by the amount of electricity flowing through the horn. Better technology came into play by the 80s, including the horn being fitted with a special mic attached with a long cord . I miss having Miles around just as a sort of Jazz Guru or true grit genre advocate. Happy Birthday Dewey!!  You were the Best!

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RAKIN’ AND SCRAPIN’ AT CATALINA’S : PHAROAH SANDERS with HAROLD MABERN


Pharoah_Sanders 901x1024posted by @blues2jazzguy

Pharoah Sanders possesses one of the most distinctive tenor saxophone sounds in jazz. Harmonically rich and heavy with overtones, Sanders’ sound can be as raw and abrasive as it is possible for a saxophonist to produce. Yet, Sanders is highly regarded to the point of reverence by a great many jazz fans. Although he made his name with expressionistic, nearly anarchic free jazz in John Coltrane’s late ensembles of the mid-’60s, Sanders’ later music is guided by more graceful concerns.

The hallmarks of Sanders’ playing at that time were naked aggression and unrestrained passion. In the years after Coltrane’s death, however, Sanders explored other, somewhat gentler and perhaps more cerebral avenues — without, it should be added, sacrificing any of the intensity that defined his work as an apprentice to Coltrane.

 

Harold Mabern-Piano

Harold Mabern – Master Pianist  Harold Mabern, one of jazz’s most enduring and dazzlingly skilled pianists, was born in Memphis, a city that produced saxophonists George Coleman and Charles Lloyd, pianist Phineas Newborn Jr. and trumpeter Booker Little. He was an unsung hero of the 1960s hardbop scene, performing and recording with many of its finest artists, and only in recent years has he begun to garner appreciation for his long-running legacy in jazz and the understated power of his talent; as critic Gary Giddins has written, “With the wind at his back, he can sound like an ocean roar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During his over half-century on the scene as sideman and leader, he has played and recorded with such greats as Lee Morgan, Sonny Rollins, Hank Mobley, Freddie Hubbard and Miles Davis, just to name a few. “I was never concerned with being a leader, I just always wanted to be the best sideman I could be. Be in the background so you can shine through.

Tickets on sale online  call ahead for Reservations

JUNE 9th – JUNE 11th    THREE DAYS ONLY

 Catalina Bar & Grill · $$
Intimate music venue features the biggest names in jazz & serves drinks, plus Italian-American fare.
Address: 6725 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90028
Phone: (323) 466-2210

JAZZ PIANIST ERIC REED TO APPEAR AT LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART


Eric Reed Today

Eric Reed Today

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

posted by Robert J. Carmack   #blues2jazzguy

Go and witness the incredible playing of Eric Reed  “Live At LACMA”  Los Angeles County Museum of Art Jazz Series

Friday May 6th@6pm  Wilshire Blvd & Ogden Ave(Near Fairfax)

http://www.lacma.org    eric_reed_Now Casual

Award-winning pianist and composer Eric Scott Reed began playing the piano at age two and was performing in his father’s Baptist church in Philadelphia by age five. After study at Philadelphia’s Settlement Music School and Los Angeles’ Colburn School of Arts, Reed embarked upon a professional career that has taken him all over the world. His credits include Wynton Marsalis, Jessye Norman, Quincy Jones, Patti Labelle and others. Reed has taught at The Juilliard School of Music and gives master classes and lecture demonstrations on the history of music. His other musical ventures include over 20 recordings as a leader, including his latest recording, The Dancing Monk; scoring for Eddie Murphy’s comedy, Life; and musical direction for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Currently Reed is in residence with the Ebony Repertory Theatre of Los Angeles, as musical director of Regina Taylor’s Crowns.

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