Tag Archives: beBop

LADY KRISTINA AT LARGE IN NEW YORK: JAZZ AND GENTRIFICATION


 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Kristina McBride ~Int’l Jazz Editor at Large   I recently ventured to NYC to go see the legendary Pharaoh Sanders in Brooklyn. I hadn’t been to New York in around 13 years, so I wanted to take my time and see the city and experience it all over again, taking in the old with the new. It felt wonderful to walk the streets again, block after block. I considered the fact that I had never been to Harlem and wanted to get off the beaten trail, so I got on the A-Train and got off at 125th and Malcom X Blvd. I was overcome with a sense of peace and excitement simultaneously.

I had arrived in the cultural mecca of Black Americans. Legends had walked these streets: Langston Hughes, Malcom X, Zora Neale Hurston, Amiri Baraka, Duke Ellington, Billy Holiday, Miles Davis…I can go on and on. I was hearing Gregory Porter’s “On My Way to Harlem” on a loop in the musical soundtrack of my mind.  I gazed at the buildings surrounding me.  All the goings-on was a sensory wonderland, displaying mothers pushing their babies around the corner while on their cellphones.. a young man rushing toward the subway, perhaps he won’t be late to his shift.

Wow..the Nigerian grandmothers sitting at their stalls with their wares for sale, fanning themselves from the impossible heat of a New York Summer.  And, of course I walked past the Apollo Theater, snapped a few pictures of myself, Then I sauntered in the vibes and wisdom from the vendors selling their body oils, shea butter,black seed soap and Dashikis.

I finally met up with a long-time friend, both of us were hungry,  we decided to stop by a café for some grub. On the way, he pointed to the left and said, “There it is…that was the Lenox Lounge.” I paused abruptly on the sidewalk, taking in the sight in front of me. It was a massive, hollowed space flanked by two buildings with awnings.  I stood in front of the empty lot where the Lenox Lounge once stood, now filled with bulldozers that will go back to work demolishing what remained that following Monday. Including a massive, blue metal removal bin, I wonder what was in it. Could it be any of the chairs or light fixtures, or maybe pieces of the beautiful, honeycomb tile floor? Not even the marquee was there. One would never know that the place ever existed.

Rumors are a Sephora is being constructed in its place. Another frivolous, over-priced store in a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood. Or at least they’re trying to. Only just a few weeks before my visit there, was a vote to stop the renaming of a section of Harlem to “SoHa” (short for South Harlem). Harlemites wouldn’t stand for that nonsense.

I wish this could have been the case in D.C. where this is happening all over as the “brown folks” are being moved out to attract younger, richer, and incidentally more white people into the city. “The sight of a Whole Foods at the Corner of Malcolm X Blvd and 125th befuddled me as I came out of the subway station.” Such an odd place for a store like that for that neighborhood, but it’s a sign of things to come.

So many of our cultural landmarks and venues that was home to Black America’s music and its artists over generations are rapidly disappearing: Bohemian Caverns and HR-57 in Washington, D.C.; in Philadelphia, although they have been long-gone are Pep’s and The Showboat, and it’s even worse nowadays according to some long-time Philadelphians.

Older Philly Jazz fans into their 80’s now, feel the new spots  aren’t hosting any jazz whatsoever. In  Los Angeles, the home of Leimert Park’s World Stage, they too have been bullied by the threat of gentrification. Presently preparing to put up a staunch fight for culture and legacy . We now have to hear jazz in these sterile environments, where the band has to fight with the noise of people chatting-away as musicians create Living Art right in front of them.

Absolute worst..annoying people practically standing on the bandstand just to capture video and pictures to post to FB, and insta-gram, trying to prove how hip they are .

Most aren’t really into the music anyway.  Even worse than all that , if you do love the music and want to go out to hear a good gig, it’s a small fortune sometimes, $15 and up covers plus $20 food/drink minimum is not uncommon. Good luck if the gig is in a city that requires pay to park! The venues aren’t paying anything decent for the band to play, so musicians aren’t working.

Kristina on Sax

The artistry and music are suffering because of it all, Hopefully, there is an urgency to remedy this situation.

I contemplated this as I walked away from the empty, hollow shell where the Lenox Lounge once stood, looking back several times,searching deeply for a sense of hope. ### by Kristina McBride

Next Up Nov.1:They Called Him Morgan:My Spin on the Movie

 

 

 

 

SPIRITS OF CENTRAL AVENUE PAST: CENTRAL AVE. JAZZ FESTIVAL 2017


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 22nd Annual Central Avenue Jazz Festival, hosted by L.A. Council member Curren D. Price, Jr., is upon us, and we hope you can join the party as we celebrate South L.A.’s rich cultural past, present and future!

The FREE event on Saturday, July 29 and Sunday, July 30 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., includes performances by dozens of highly talented and recognized Jazz musicians.

The two-day festival will feature prominent performers on three stages with live music, pavilions focused on arts, health, youth, business and employment resources along with food and merchandise available to purchase. For more information, including a complete schedule of performances,

please visit http://www.centralavejazz.org/

Robert J.Carmack Plight Jazz Ensemble leader ***  publisher hipster sanctuary.com

 

PROFOUND SIMPLICITY: A GLIMPSE OF DWIGHT TRIBLE


posted by  #@blues2 jazz guy

“Profound Simplicity”- A Glimpse of Dwight Trible” by Kristina McBride

I’ve been spinning quite a bit of music lately, listening to the inner urge of Joe Henderson’s tenor sax, Lee Morgan’s blistering trumpet solo telling it like it is, Black Arthur breaking down Lenox Ave on my new Rega RP3 with a fantastic vintage Scott 382-B amplifier and speaker combination. The music and sound combination that comes at me is sensational, bringing me closer to the music more than ever. I’ve begun to listen to and feel music more deeply over time. Through music I travel freely through time and space, exploring my inner-most emotions and dreams. In the spellbinding voice of Dwight Trible, I embark on a musical voyage, exploring new depths of musical consciousness.

He is a vocalist-songwriter, poet and musical healer. That he is so shamefully under-acknowledged in the music world is especially contemptible considering how badly the world needs his music. He successfully fuses jazz, blues, and gospel while also being known to reference opera and Gregorian chants during his presentation. He’s collaborated with contemporaries such as J-Dilla, Kamasi Washington, and John Beasley.  I stumbled upon his music on a balmy Florida afternoon while I listened to WPFW in Washington, D.C. I heard Trible’s sonorous voice laced on top of the lush, romantic piano, string and percussion ensemble of Quasimode as he sang “Midnight Flower”.  I was captivated straight away, my body becoming warm and I became aware of the sensual arousal I felt as I listened. His voice beckoned me, touching my soul with the immediate force evoked by the supernatural allure of his voice.

Trible is a full-bodied baritone that can ascend to a soul-stirring falsetto that is unwavering at any tempo or volume. His profound connection to music is present in each song he approaches. Trible’s masterful interpretation of Andy Bey’s “Celestial Blues” is the epitome of spiritual jazz singing, where he showcases his masterful, soul-stirring vibrato and vocal range. Trible’s singing is evocative of vibrant colors and textures, of romance, peace, and happiness. It has healing power, a unifier, a beacon of hope and light.       

 

 

 

 

Trible grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio with three siblings and both his parents. He began singing as a young child, inspired by his mother. “I remember sitting on the couch when she cleaned up, and I couldn’t have been more than two or three years-old. But I would just sit there and listen to my mother sing, mesmerized, almost in a trance. So, I guess she was probably my first inspiration for singing. Judging from my personality and my makeup perhaps I really didn’t have a choice in the matter, because when I look back on what else I could have done had I not been involved in that…for the most part I cannot think of anything else that it would be,” he remembered.

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“From my perspective, I try to get to the core of what it is…I look at it as profound simplicity. For something to be profound it doesn’t have to be complicated. It doesn’t have to be something that nobody understands what it is. Be who you are. And you be the most Dwight Trible you can be. And that’s all it is.”

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when I asked him how he began singing, and what he aspired to be when he grew up.  His mother would send them to the local theater after church every Sunday, and to keep from growing bored while watching the film, he began improvising to the music.

“I wonder what your siblings thought of you doing that,” I asked him, laughing as I imagined him with his then short legs dangling from the chair as he crooned to the music.

“Oh, they would be so angry with me. I remember once, my brother coming home and telling my mother, ‘Dwight was in-there singing again! He was in-there singing again!’” he recalled with a boisterous laugh. “’Cause God knows how loud I was singing. I guess I did it so much and it probably used to get on their nerves, but it was my nature to do it.” Surely these early singing experiments brought him a long way to becoming a master of his craft.

Trible was saturated with music throughout his childhood, drawing inspiration from Mahalia Jackson, Aretha Franklin, Donny Hathaway, and Linda Jones, who had the 1967 hit “Hypnotized, tune that had a major influence on his singing style.  “I was a Linda Jones freak! She was somebody that really resonated with me, and I would say that I was influenced by her more than anyone else, “ he remembered. He later sang with local R & B and gospel groups before outgrowing the Cincinnati music scene. He deeply felt he had to go abroad in order to grow as an artist, and was encouraged by his peers and fellow musicians.

He set his sights on Los Angeles, California, arriving at an extremely fertile time, and was quickly ushered into the L.A. music community by the late legends pianist Horace Tapscott (whom he later dedicated a whole album to) and drummer Billy Higgins. When I asked him what it was like being mentored by Tapscott, he was full of enthusiasm in his response and gave a funny anecdote: “Everything that I thought I knew about music, when I heard this guy play for the first time, it just blew my mind in such a way that, everything I knew, had to go, because I’d seen the light! And, it was strange because when I first saw him, he would come to the club where I was performing, and I’d be on stage and he’d be at the door watching. I would close my eyes and sing a few bars, and by the time I’d open my eyes, he’d be gone! He always did this. It was something else, man… and then one day, he told me to come to his house. I showed up and he had all these plans laid out for me to join The Ark (the nickname for the Pan Afrikan People’s Arkestra). And I was stunned because I didn’t think I was ready for all of that. I guess he felt I was.”

Tapscott appointed Trible to vocal director of the Pan-Afrikan People’s Arkestra shortly after, a move that would boost his confidence as a musician and would expand his profile throughout the music scene.

He later had the fortune of meeting the great Billy Higgins, who thrusted him out of his shyness and exposed his immense, unique talents to several giants of the jazz world: Pharaoh Sanders, Bobby Hutcherson, Charles Lloyd, and Mulgrew Miller. Although he and Pharaoh were familiar with each other, their musical collaboration didn’t come until after Higgins passed away. “Higgins was a guy who made everybody that he played with sound better. He had this way of sizing you up really, really quickly. He had this sort of telepathy  where he knew, when you first started playing with you, he could get inside you, find out who you were, and what you needed.  Then he would give you that “thing” to take you over the top. He just had that magic.

That’s why everybody, from Herbie Hancock on down, loved playing with Billy Higgins,” he reflected with nostalgia and deep affection in his voice. He later met the late vocalist Betty Carter, and was impressed by her artistry and professionalism, and would go on to incorporate a great deal of her style in his own singing. “And I would say that’s really it for me. And all the rest is me and the spirit working together, “he says optimistically. This writer could feel the peace he had within himself in his words, brimming with optimism. 

The Leimert Park arts scene in L.A. is a significant part of Trible’s identity and purpose as an artist and community advocate. He has served as the musical director of the World Stage for the past five years and has worked with the numerous grassroots organizations to fight against the threat of gentrification that targets the historic black cultural epicenter of the West Coast. He can often be found performing at the Blue Whale or The World Stage with a stellar lineup of musicians.

When he’s not singing in L.A. he can be found on a trans-Atlantic flight to London, as he recently did to cut a record with Matthew Halsall titled “Inspirations” (Gondwana label), released in June. He travelled across the pond to London to record with Halsall, as well as touring several cities throughout Europe.“Everywhere we went, you know…the people really, really loved it. Every house was completely packed, and there wasn’t a dry eye in the house every time we finished,” he told me when I asked him about the tour.  I can see how that could totally be the case. His voice stirs something inside you when he sings. No matter what language you speak, where you’re from, your age, it reaches you.  Sadly, he’s not well-known here in the U.S. where he has been singing for nearly 50 years.

It is beyond comprehension that he could have sung and collaborated with heavy-hitters such as Kenny Burrell, Harry Belafonte, Harold Land, Patrice Rushen, and Kenny Garrett, yet still be low-profile.  When I asked him his thoughts about this low-profile in the music world, he replied, “Yeah, it’s kinda interesting how I can go over there and probably work as much as I want to, whereas here, in this country, it is probably more difficult for me to get work here than it is over there.”

“It’s kinda sad,” I replied to him solemnly. “A hard time to be an artist. Too many musicians are struggling to find work here and there’s nowhere for them to play anymore. All the venues are drying up because of rising rents for venues and the cost of living for the artists, and widespread gentrification in the places where the music is popular. And the musicians hardly get paid anything on a gig most of the time. It’s a travesty and a great disservice to the music.”

His optimism and beautiful spirit radiated in his reply:

“Well, you know, I don’t look at it as sad really. I just think that it’s just the way things went, and the beautiful thing is, again, every day I get the opportunity to wake up and do what I love to do. And that’s the main thing. So as long as that can happen, I don’t think of any of it as sad. It’s all good, as far as I’m concerned.”

The album title came from the feeling that the world needs inspiration to carry on in these dark times, in the era of Donald Trump and uncertainty, hopelessness, and anxiety felt amongst many people right now. He delivers a spellbinding version of “What the World Needs Now”, a swinging waltz much like the feeling and style of Coltrane’s signature tune “My Favorite Things”. This writer wondered, if he got inspiration from Coltrane to record this song in this manner, with him as a being a major influence on Trible. The addition of a harpist (Rachel Gladwin channeling a bit of Alice Coltrane in this tune) gives the song an ethereal, jubilant feeling that propels your spirit forth into an ocean of good vibes. Trumpeter Matthew Halsall executes a soulful, yet melancholy solo calling for hope and love for humanity through his horn. Trible finishes out the song and takes us to church, getting down and gritty with his gospel-styled ad-libs. He puts his trademark on several standards throughout the album such as “Feeling Good” and “Ooh, Child”, but you will not get bored hearing them again. Dwight put his signature style on each and everyone of them.

There are many vocalists out here singing, yet Dwight Trible stands-out on an island of his own. He’s truly an artist with such versatility that has something for everyone, and plenty to give. He has an ingenuity that is clearly present in his singing… and that radiates from his spirit. He’s not in this for the fame or fortune (if only!!), but in my mind, be a messenger of love and peace, which are common themes of many of the songs he sings.

He broke down his philosophy for me and outlook on life: “From my perspective, I try to get to the core of what it is…I look at it as profound simplicity. For something to be profound, it doesn’t have to be complicated. It doesn’t have to be something that nobody understands what it is. Be who you are. And being the most Dwight Trible I can be. And that’s all it is.”    ###          (follow Kristina Mcbride on this blog)

Recommended Listening:

Cosmic- (2011, Katalyst Entertainment)

Living Water- (2004, Ninja Tune)

Inspirations- (2017, Gondwana Records)

Quasimode Sounds of Peace- (2008, Geneon)

http://www.dwighttriblemusic.com

please send into this blog your comments or appreciation for this fine article…Thank you – Publisher

 

L.A. CLUB PAYS TRIBUTE TO McCOY TYNER WITH EXPLOSIVE JAZZ CONCERT


posted by Kamaad Tauhid #@blues2jazzguy

McCoy Tyner Tribute Quartet photo RJ Carmack
Roy McCurdy Drums photo Chuck Koton
Theo Saunders Keyboards with Juini Booth in background photo Chuck  Koton
Robert J. Carmack Emcee/Spoken Word Poet photo A. Scott Galloway
A. Scott Galloway Music journalist

Re-posted from Facebook Post July 6th ..

Had the pleasure of taking in some smokin’ live jazz with fireworks as a backdrop for my 4th of July at a new REAL Jazz spot in Glendale named Zebulon. The quartet on deck equally featured saxophonist Azar Lawrence, drummer Roy McCurdy, keyboardist Theo Saunders and bassist Juini Booth paying homage to McCoy Tyner, John Coltrane and Elvin Jones. The emcee for the evening was Robert J. Carmack who also got in two powerful spoken word pieces with these giants at his back.

Try to make it out to this fine new venue which has a bar/lounge in front and a nice sized room for live music in the back. Also has valet parking and limited adjacent free parking on the streets behind it…on Fletcher Drive just north of Riverside Drive. Consider yourself hip tipped!

BUSTER WILLIAMS BUSTED LOOSE AT 75th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION CONCERT


Buster Williams & Jazz Journalist Robert J. Carmack photo by Robert Hill

posted by Robert J. Carmack

You know anytime you have a name like Buster , the bar is already set high! No need to worry as the 75 year old bassist did not disappoint the crowd attending the concert at Nate Holden Performing Arts Center in Los Angeles last weekend(June 24). Buster Williams led an all-star team of jazz veterans into los Angeles anchored by the iconic drummer, Lenny White.

Lenny White drums

One of the surprises of the evening was the youngest member of the band in pianist,George Colligan. George is a jazz pianist, organist, drummer, trumpet player, educator, composer and bandleader based in Portland, Oregon. Colligan was born in New Jersey, and raised in Columbia, Maryland. He attended the Peabody Institute, majoring in classical trumpet and music education. In high school he learned to play the drums and later switched to piano. His playing is influenced by Chick Corea, Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Thelonious Monk, Wayne Shorter, and McCoy Tyner. The influences showed in many ways as he blistered solo after solo , which at times he seemed to levitate up from the piano stool, especially on a time honored classic as “I Didn’t Know What Time It Was”

George Colligan

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Wilson has attained ubiquitous status in the studio and on the stage with the greatest names in jazz, as well as critical acclaim as a bandleader in his own right. A musician’s musician, Wilson has brought his distinctive sound to more than 150 recordings led by such celebrated and wide-ranging artists as Chick Corea, George Duke, Michael Brecker, Dave Holland, Dianne Reeves, Bill Bruford, Gerald Wilson, Maria Schneider, Joe Henderson, Charlie Byrd, Billy Childs, Karrin Allyson, Don Byron, and Mulgrew Miller among many others. He has eight recordings as a leader.

Steve Wilson.

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Anthony “Buster” Williams is THE “consummate”  jazz bassist. Williams is known for his membership in pianist Herbie Hancock’s early 1970s group, working with guitarist Larry Coryell in the 1980s.  Mid-1960s Buster recorded a plethora of sessions with Jazz Crusaders. He also worked in the Thelonious Monk Repertory Band, Mary Lou Williams Collective, Harold Land Quintet, Sphere and as the accompanist of choice for many singers, notably Ms. Nancy Wilson.

Buster soloing is as sublime as a “brand new Rolls Royce’s interior…his lines are impeccable, as he directs the band through his dynamics in the compositions. He gets the absolute maximum out of a quartet. with a drummer like White who paints as well as keeping time, but more importantly , the unit engages the audience into the story by the composer. Colligan’s experience with Buster, goes all the way back to the mid 90s, which gives him an edge to lead the band with his melodic solos into uncharted waters. Steve Wilson on Sax tends to provide at times, hummingbird-like precision playing of the melody. Followed by his own sub-themed compositions inside the original piece.. which acts like a butterfly leaving a cocoon. All in tow of placing the listener on the edge of their seats. He certainly made it a glorious occasion on last Saturday night performances. Salud!! Salud!! Master Buster. Thank You JAZZ BAKERY and RUTH PRICE!

“You Don’t Just Hear the Music,You Experience the Music”

Herbie Hancock

KEYSTONE KLIPPINS’:JAZZ ICONS SPEAK ABOUT TODD BARKAN AND SAN FRANCISCO’S KEYSTONE KORNER


posted by Robert J. Carmack     #@blues2jazzguy

Jazz impresario Todd Barkan is returning to the scene of the Jazz Crime, San Francisco with two dates to remember. July 7 & 8.

The great pianist/composer Mary Lou Williams referred to Keystone Korner as “the Birdland of the Seventies.” Art Blakey, Miles Davis, and Stan Getz all agreed that Keystone Korner was “the best jazz club in the world.”

Band personnel: Azar Lawrence, Eddie Henderson, Mel Martin, Benito Gonzalez, Denny Zeitlin, Juini Booth,Roy McCurdy(just added) Akira Tana, Ray Drummond,Kenneth Nash, Charles McPherson, Gary Bartz & lots more!!

Friday, July 7, 7:00 pm

Kuumbwa Jazz Center
320 Cedar Street, Santa Cruz
831-427-2227
Tickets: $30/35

Saturday, July 8, 2:00 pm

Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society
311 Mirada Drive, Half Moon Bay
650-726-4143
Advance: Adults $45/35, Students $25 (25 & under with ID)
Door: Adults $50, Students $30

Saturday, July 8, 7:00-11:00 pm

Pier 23 Cafe
On the Embarcadero at the foot of Greenwich, San Francisco
415-362-5125
No advance tickets / $10 cover charge

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Barkan has assembled a “heavyweight contending” lineup for our listening pleasure. Also, its sure to offer tons of surprises from musicians & friends from over the years. Be There!!

In our series on Keystone Klippins’ – a snapshot into the thoughts and ideas of some of the “Cats” that played the “Korner” over the years and back to help celebrate the 45th anniversary with Todd and Friends. Coming Next!! Wednesday June 21, Saxophonist Mel Martin and Bassist, Juini Booth.

Charles Mcpherson – alto sax /composer/husband/dad

One of my most challenging conversations because of the time restraints. I wanted so many questions answered and so little time. I was able to find out some “nuggets for the real jazz fans. such as, I did not know he went to high school with Roy Brooks and they played in his first jazz band together. Also, Brooks was a star athlete, especially basketball. Living and growing up in Detroit, you are bound to bump into or come up against some of the “most superb” musicians in the world. Sure enough, he played with a guy known as the Charlie Parker of the bass in Detroit. Non-other than James Jamerson of Motown fame.. Yes! he was a jazz bassist too. I was a student of the saxophone at the time I learned about Charlie Parker in early 1960s, My guys on alto at the time was Bird, Jackie Mclean, Cannonball and Charles Mcpherson(I called him that guy with Mingus band not Dolphy). He always looked so cool playing with Mingus and the rest of the band.. He was built for Mingus…kind of like Charlie Rouse was built for Monk. He was his own man not a Bird clone.

Another jazz hero of mine was Barry Harris, (pianist with Lee Morgan on the Sidewinder) Lee Morgan’s record introduced me to the bop sound of Harris, which led me to the records by Harris including Charles McPherson on Saxophones.

I asked Charles about, what it was like playing the Keystone Korner in the day? Mcpherson:” Man it was a delight playing there. Todd was a REAL JAZZ FAN, not just an owner. We had fun there always over the years and I wound up the very last booked act at the Keystone in 1983″.  “my most memorable times was the Two- Biller Allstar bands with split sets. Man! Nobody was doing with jazz what Todd was doing to pack in the true jazz fans,added McPherson. Tony Williams – Barry Harris double bills!”

“I’m really looking forward to hooking up with cats I haven’t seen in a few and having that spirit of the old Keystone Korner days.”

A teenage friend of this writer who was studying saxophone also turned me on to this album in 1965.. a stellar lineup of great musicians . I still enjoy putting this one on.

Charles McPherson was born in Joplin, Missouri and moved to Detroit at age nine. After growing up in Detroit, he studied with the renowned pianist Barry Harris and started playing jazz professionally at age 19.  He moved from Detroit to New York in 1959 and performed with Charles Mingus from 1960 to 1972. While performing with Mingus, he collaborated frequently with Harris, Lonnie Hillyer (trumpet), and George Coleman (tenor sax).

Charles McPherson was recently featured at Lincoln Center showcasing his original compositions and arrangements with a seven-piece ensemble. He has toured the U.S., Europe, Japan, Africa and South America with his own groups, as well as with jazz greats Barry Harris, Billy Eckstine, Lionel Hampton, Nat Adderley, Jay McShann, Phil Woods, Wynton Marsalis, Tom Harrell, Randy Brecker, James Moody, Dizzy Gillespie, and many others.

Over the years Charles has travelled as special guest artist with Charlie Mingus, Barry Harris, Art Farmer, Kenny Drew, Toshiko Akiyoshi, the Carnegie Hall Jazz Orchestra, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. He has recorded as leader on Prestige, Fantasy, Mainstream, Discovery, Xanadu, and most recently Arabesque. His most recent recording is the highly acclaimed “Manhattan Nocturne.”

Charles was also the featured alto saxophonist in the Clint Eastwood film “Bird,” a biography about Charlie Parker.

McPherson remains a strong, viable force on the jazz scene today. He is at the height of his powers. His playing combines passionate feeling with intricate patterns of improvisation.

For more information and news of his collaboration with the San Diego Ballet featuring his daughter (see link below)

http://www.charlesmcpherson.com

Charles & Camille McPherson (daughter)

 

JUINI BOOTH & The MCCOY TYNER TRIBUTE QUARTET @ZEBULON CAFE-LOS ANGELES


 

 

 

 

The McCoy Tyner Tribute Quartet  July 4th Explosive Concert

Band personnel: Juini Booth leader/bass, Roy McCurdy drums, piano Theo Saunders, Azar Lawrence saxophones, guest jazz poet, Robert J. Carmack 

JULY 4th 2017  8pm- 10PM only 

ZEBULON CAFE ONE NIGHT ONLY !!

Tixs: $10 advance $12 at door

Zebulon, 2478 Fletcher Drive. Los Angeles,CA. 90039

(323) 662-0966 (club only)

 

 

KEYSTONE KLIPPINS’~ WHEN JAZZ HISTORY, GOOD FRIENDS AND GREAT MUSICIANS COME TOGETHER


Joao Gilberto, Billy Hart, and Todd Barkan May 1976 pix: Tom Copi

posted  #@blues2jazzguy Robert J.Carmack

If its one thing I can say about Todd Barkan, he’s one of the hardest working jazz presenters ,producer and all around good guy. Over the last few months I’ve spoken with various musicians  that have either worked with, or for Todd. They all say to the man “He’s one of a kind, like family, and has his head on straight in knowing exactly where he wants to take the music” .

Among the best moves he ever made was establishing a club called The Keystone Korner..Jumping off right at a time when Jazz was waffling in the Bay area, particularly in San Francisco. With a head full of bright ideas and a few dollars, he was able to recruit some of the best musicians in the bay area at the time.   He then grew that into a virtual “Who’s Who”. Its foolish to try to  post a laundry list of legends who played the “Korner”.

In fact, It’s easier to say who didn’t. To name a few;                   Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers, Dexter Gordon, Bobby Hutcherson,Joe Henderson, Jimmy Smith, Freddie Hubbard, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Michael White, McCoy Tyner and on and on. Some of these stints were recorded “LIVE” and later released as collector’s sessions at the Keystone Korner. (see Bright Moments and Atlantis) 

 

So it’s no surprise when Todd organized this 45th anniversary  celebration scheduled to take place in the San Francisco bay area  .. You can join him and all his friends in the Bay area July 7 & 8 2017. (see venues and times below)

Three Exciting Dates of Electrifying Music for You  

July 7th 2017 – KUUMBWA JAZZ CENTER  7:pm 

Santa Cruz,CA.

July 8th 2017 – BACH DANCING & DYNAMITE SOCIETY

2:pm HALF MOON BAY,CA. call ahead for reservations are suggested

July 8th 2017 – PIER 23 on the EMBARCADERO -7:pm            San Francisco, CA.  reservations are suggested

The action gets started with legendary artists performing

Charles McPherson..Gary Bartz.. Azar Lawrence.. Eddie Henderson.. Mel Martin.. Ray Drummond.. Kenneth Nash.. Benito Gonzalez.. Juini Booth, Denny Zeitlin & quite a few other surprises.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION OF KEYSTONE KORNER on JULY 7-8, 2017, with Charles McPherson, Gary Bartz, Eddie Henderson, Denny Zeitlin, Benito Gonzalez, Mel Martin, Ray Drummond, Juini Booth,  Calvin Keys, Kenneth Nash, et al. Todd Barkan, MC.
 
KUUMBWA JAZZ CENTER, SANTA CRUZ, CA.
FRIDAY, JULY 7, 7 pm.  www.kuumbwajazz.org
 
BACH DANCING & DYNAMITE SOCIETY
HALF MOON BAY, CALIFORNIA
SATURDAY, JULY 8, 2-4 pm www.bachddsoc.org
 
PIER 23 CAFE, EMBARCADERO, SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JULY 8, 7-12 pm

JAZZ BASS LEGEND JUINI BOOTH CONNECTS BROOKLYN IN L.A.


 

 

 

 

Certainly no stranger to creating eclectic ambiance, jazz bassist Juini Booth rolls into Los Angeles with all the excitement of the second coming!.. But realistically, He’s put together a great team of Brooklyn Club owners that loves’ Jazz served up New York style, with a stellar group of musicians, including a jazz poet.

It makes one wonder if he will come with a combination Sun Ra, or Chicago Art Ensemble. We’ve been told most of the material will be in the spirit of the Atlantis album by McCoy Tyner ,recorded LIVE in 1974 at the celebrated Keystone Korner. Adding some spoken word sprinkled in. ” We expect a very diverse audience with impeccable taste in Music, Art and Hipness” .

In Brooklyn , the Zebulon Cafe was quite popular among the young and the young at heart, chided Booth.  Juini  has shaped a very stellar career in music , sometimes dropping off the Jazz scene to tackle other musical genres. “This allows me to open up to all types of music, sounds and rhythms.  His impeccable list of bandleaders and recording projects are a “Who’s Who” in Jazz. McCoy Tyner, Sun Ra, Pharoah Sanders and Freddie Hubbard to name a few. In addition to playing and recording projects, Juini’s  been spending his available hours with a project he holds dear to him, the Wilbur Ware Institute. He teaches and inspires young musicians in New York.

Band personnel: Juini Booth leader/bass, Roy McCurdy drums, piano Benito Gonzalez, Azar Lawrence saxophones, guest jazz poet, Robert J. Carmack 

JULY 4th 2017  8pm- 10PM only 

ZEBULON CAFE ONE NIGHT ONLY !!

Tixs: $10 advance $12 at door

Zebulon, 2478 Fletcher Drive.(323) 662-0966 (club only)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press/Info re-Band Attn:R.J. #@blues2jazzguy  blues2jazz2003@yahoo.com 951-840-7120

 

 

COMING SOON! OCTOBER 2017 STRAT-O-SPHERE: THELONIOUS MONK TURNS 100


Monk,Miles & Trane!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A ROBERT J. CARMACK  PRODUCTION

STRAT-O-SPHERE; MONK MUSIC, POETRY, DRAMA & DANCE

Los Angeles California Exclusive Showing

Whether on the bandstand or Off the bandstand ..Sitting at the Piano at home composing brilliant tunes…Greatness always followed ,along with Hipness & Swing!

More Information in coming months

Media and Sponsors inquiries:blues2jazz2003@yahoo.com