LOCAL JAZZ MUSICIANS & SINGERS SUPPORT BILLY HIGGINS WORLD STAGE


posted by Robert J. Carmack   #@blues2jazzguy

Local Jazz artists are throwing their hat in the ring, or in this case their voices and instruments. I have assembled a plethora of very talented musicians and singers to produce the “POCKET JAZZ SERIES”, a group of concerts. I’ve coined that phrase to emphasize the “small in stature, big in content” being presented at the World Stage Performance gallery, a limited seating space for the performing arts. However, “My thinking was to have two very different shows back to back weekends, so those that cannot make one, they maybe able to make the other.”

Starting with Saturday August 22 at 7:30 ,@ World Stage 4344 Degnan Blvd. Los Angeles,CA 90008, tickets/Info 951-840-7120  we’re kicking off the Series with a moving tribute. The GENIUS of DUKE PEARSON:Thanks Uncle Duke. the evening will be filled with sparkling Duke Pearson compositions, along with other composers who was either produced by Duke or, worked with him, such Donald Byrd, Cedar Walton, Bobby Hutcherson ,etc.  The music is being performed by The UNCLE DUKE LEGACY BAND featuring veteran jazz pianist/music director, Bobby West. voices featured are Aldene “Pat” Sligh, Jana Wilson and Mechelle La’Chaux .  Come out and celebrate a fresh new approach to exposing an audience to unsung greatness and such historic significance. writer of such popular jazz classics as Jeannine, Fancy Free, Sudel, Wahoo, Sweet Honeybee, Big Bertha’, Gaslight,ESP,and most famous , Christo Redentor, just to name a few.. make an evening of it. Tickets are $15-$20 limited Seating- first come first served, those with tickets will have seat priority.

Int'l Jazz Pianist Bobby West
Int’l Jazz Pianist Bobby West
Ishmael Hunter
Drummer Ishmael Hunter
Reggie Carson Bass
Reggie Carson Bassist
Derf Reklaw on Flute
Derf Reklaw Flute /Saxes/percussions
jana Wilson pat sligh daughter
Jana Wilson Jazz/Blues Singer
Mechelle La’ Chaux Actress/ Singer blues/Jazz/ R&B
Pat Sligh Jazz vocalist/ Actress
Pat Sligh Jazz vocalist/ Actress
Robert J. Carmack producer/actor/journalist - poet
Robert J. Carmack producer/actor/journalist – poet
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THE JAZZ PIONEERS ROOM BIG JOHN PATTON B3 & GREASE = SOUL JAZZ


posted by #@blues2jazzguy  Robert J. Carmack

John Patton, often known as “Big John” Patton, was one of Blue Note Records most active soul-jazz organists during the golden age of the Hammond B-3s. Between 1963 and 1970 Patton developed 11 albums’ worth of material as a leader and “sat- in” with an enormous procession of skilled improvisers. Arguably his best work has since been compared with that of  innovator Larry Young.

big-john-patton Color -300x300Patton was born in Kansas City, MO, on July 12, 1935. His mother was a church pianist who encouraged her son to learn the instrument. He began to play at the age of 13. During the mid-’50s, Patton worked in bands accompanying rhythm & blues singer Lloyd Price.    By 1961, he had switched over to the organ, advancing along the trail blazed by Jimmy Smith, Shirley Scott, and Brother Jack McDuff.   It was alto saxophonist Lou Donaldson who initially took Patton the organist into a recording studio first on May 9, 1962, to tape an LP to be called The Natural Soul, then on January 24, 1963, a lengthy session that yielded enough material for the albums “Good Gracious and Signifyin’.”   john_patton  OH BABY  Band W sister

On February 2, 1963, Patton sat in  on Jimmy Smith’s Rockin the Boat session  playing only a tambourine. He spent the rest of that year making great music as a leader and sideman, jousting ideas and energies with his close Blue Note collaborator guitarist Grant Green (on the album Am I Blue?) and with saxophonists George Braith (on Patton’s Blue John), Harold Vick (on Steppin’ Out!), Johnny Griffin (on Soul Groove), Don Wilkerson (on Shoutin’), and Red Holloway (on Burner). john_patton WAY I FEEL BIG NOW

Over the next few years Patton recorded with trumpeter Richard Williams (on Patton’s Way I Feel) and vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson (on Patton’s Let ‘Em Roll), and also appeared as a catalytic agent on Grant Green’s album Iron City, George Braith’s Laughing Soul, Clifford Jordan’s Soul Fountain, and drummer Grassella Oliphant’s Grass Is Greener with trumpeter Clark Terry and saxophonist Harold Ousley. In 1968 Patton’s recording unit included saxophonists Junior Cook and Harold Alexander. The last of his albums from this period (Accent on the Blues and Memphis to New York Spirit) featured saxophonists Marvin Cabell and George Coleman as well as guitarist James Blood Ulmer.

After 1970 Patton quit the scene for a long while, quietly residing in East Orange, NJ. He contributed to vibraphonist Johnny Lytle’s Everything Must Change in 1977, recorded his own Soul Connection in 1983 with guitarist Melvin Sparks and visionary trombonist Grachan Moncur III, then cut two albums with guitarist Jimmy Ponder: Mean Streets: No Bridges (1987) and Jump (1988).    big-john-smoke NOW patton

Big John Patton’s comeback began in 1993-1994 with two albums featuring saxophonist John Zorn: Blue Planet Man and Minor Swing. Here he touched upon edgy ground similar to that which he had explored in 1968. His last major album, This One’s for J.A., was recorded in December 1996. On March 19, 2002, 66-year-old John Patton succumbed to diabetes and renal failure. Overshadowed by organists who for one reason or another enjoyed greater popularity, and still underestimated by many jazz critics and historians, Patton and his recorded legacy are ripe and ready for open-minded reevaluation~info courtesy of blue note records.

A SWINGIN’ JAZZ and POETRY AFFAIR at KINGSTON CAFE


posted by CHEF ROBB-the Jazz Cooker #@blues2jazzguy

Robert The HIPSTER  Carmack spittin' poetry Pasadena,Calif  4/18/15
Robert The HIPSTER Carmack spittin’ poetry
Pasadena,Calif 4/18/15

BAM!!  Now thats what I’m talking about, real jazz and poetry right out of a Bohemian film or a hipster’s pad somewhere on the east coast. Saturday night at the Kingston Cafe was all lit up with fat grooves from the baritone horn of Dale Fielder, who handled that Hog-leg of an instrument like all the guys that came before him on that horn. Pepper Adams, Cecil Payne,Leo Wright, Sahib Shihab and Charles Davis , all well known for dealing with the “beast”. Fielder was on hand with the original Dale Fielder Quartet,along with special guest poet, Robert J. Carmack. Robert is publisher and editor for Hipster Sanctuary.Com.

The original members are Thomas White drums, Bill Markus Bass, Jane Getz on piano and Dale himself ,Soprano, Tenor and Baritone saxes.

DFQ  original group from 1995
DFQ original group from 1995

Dale filled the evening with original compositions penned by himself, one in particular was Resilience , brisk moving composition which allowed the whole band to open up the throttle. Joined on the bandstand by Grammy-winning Recording Engineer/Guitarist, Bob Tucker. “This is dedicated to my band, because they have resilience to last 20+ years.”

Carmack joined the band on stage for a combined effort on one of Fielder’s CD cuts from 2001,Romance Serenade, where Robert recited an amazing original love poem called Up jumped Spring, followed by a riveting piece in tribute to Jackie McLean entitled, LET FREEDOM RING! performed alone on stage as the first set ended. After a brief break, Carmack and Fielder returned for a duet of sax and poem.. Carmack announced the next two poems to be performed was written by a local writer/journalist in Los Angeles, Eric Wattree. A Night to Remember (homage to Coltrane) and A Swingin’ Affair in tribute to Dexter Gordon.

After two swingin’ pieces, one by the hard bop pianist , George Cables. then the quartet closed out the evening’s last set with an old standard gem called , Moonglow. the theme from the movie, Picnic. Treated with kid gloves by the band, the song with a melancholy theme loomed large over the attentive audience that night. The band and poet were rewarded with loud applause for a job well done. everyone had a lot of fun, including Sculptor/Painter,Chukes and Jazz host, Brad Williams from radio KJAZZ 88.1FM  See the early discography of Dale Fielder at the following link …

http://clarionjazz.com/

HAPPY BIRTHDAY AMBASSADOR HERBIE HANCOCK LOOKING GOOD


posted by Robert J. Carmack   #@blues2jazzguy

jazz saxophonist  Mel Martin and Herbie Hancock
Saxophonist Mel Martin and Herbie Hancock photo by Mel Martin Jazz Archives

Its the birthday of the very man who once thought he would never reach the the greatness of an Oscar Peterson or a Thelonius Monk. Now 75,looking 40ish is the jazz icon who has accomplished every possible music, presidential and international recognition & Lifetime Achievement Award there is.

For me, It began in 1964, I was 14 and studying saxophone in junior high and played in a youth Jazz big band sponsored by the late great Gerald Wilson in Los Angeles. MY DAD WAS STILL MY MAIN SOURCE FOR JAZZ ALBUMS. He brought home a Blue Note album that was all blue,it had a weird name on it” Empyrean Isles” by Herbie Hancock featuring a song I could not stop playing over and over, and over again.

Cantaloupe Island  was quite dominant on radio, I heard it everywhere, in the barber shops,cafe’s on Jukeboxes and car radios and jazz stations . It had an infectious beat and groove to it that swung with a new hipness , just enough commercial to attract AM radio and FM radio stations,But enough of the old school bop playing around that groove that spoke volumes of this new artist’s approach to composition and  improvisation.

I’d been a fan of H.H. since that first album bought by my dad, but,then I was beginning to purchase my own some 9 months later.That one album turned me on to all the fellow side-men and their careers too. Herbie+Hancock-inthe1970s I am most proud that a man of his standing is the Ambassador at Large for Jazz . On the International stage, its much needed, as we in the jazz community know, its not getting its due on the american front. we’re bickering over what is Jazz, what to call it, Europeans are claiming they really started jazz and deserve to proclaim its roots.(Lol)  Herbie also has recently come on-board as professor of music at UCLA , in addition, both he and long-time collaborator,Wayne Shorter are active board members of the Thelonius Monk Institute located on campus at University of Los Angeles. I look forward to whatever comes next for Herbie Hancock, even if its just a candle blowing event. Born April 12 1940 , in Chicago ,Illinois.  HAPPY BORN-DAY HERBIE!!

PHILLY PRODIGAL SON McCOY TYNER HONORED BY MAYOR NUTTER & CITY


posted by  Robert J. Carmack   #@blues2jazzguy

McCoy TYner-600

HE’S WIDELY considered one of the most influential jazz pianists of the 20th century, and yesterday McCoy Tyner was given the keys to the city – or our equivalent, a brass, mini Liberty Bell.

Mayor Nutter recognized Tyner as the 2015 Jazz Legend Honoree during the fifth annual Philadelphia Jazz Appreciation Month, which celebrates Philly’s jazz history with musical events throughout April.

Tyner, originally from West Philly, is an icon in the jazz community, and has performed alongside musical greats such as John Coltrane, Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie. He has won four Grammys and has released nearly 80 albums under his name.

“It’s wonderful to be back home in Philadelphia,” said Tyner, 76, who has spent recent years living in New York.

mcCoy Tyner  & BOBBY
Shown: Publicist Robert J. Carmack with legendary pianist McCoy Tyner in San Francisco circa 2002

“I would like to thank the mayor and the people of this great city for making this possible for me. No matter where I am in the world, Philadelphia always has a special place in my heart.”

Nutter called Philly “the music town of the United States of America,” to raucous applause from an audience of musicians. “McCoy has changed the way everyone after him has played the piano,” said local Grammy-winning record-label owner, producer and composer Aaron Levinson.

“His percussive approach and sense of harmony signaled a new frontier for the instrument. And his embrace of African, Asian and Afro-Cuban ideas puts him in the league of Duke Ellington. Philadelphia can claim one of the giants of all time, and I applaud our mayor for making this happen.”

HIPSTER SANCTUARY JAZZ APPRECIATION MONTH IN APRIL COVERAGE: GIVE THE DRUMS SUM’


posted by Robert J. Carmack #@blues2jazzguy jazzapprmonthlogo_vertical

african drummer w tiger outfit
Photo by Robert J. Carmack Drumming Circle- Leimert Park Village , LA Calif.

Hipster Sanctuary.Com is promising some excellent coverage of Jazz in April and International Jazz Day

Coming April 1st !

POETS, MUSICIANS, DANCERS and DRUMMERS , and The DRUMMERS, and Did we say the DRUMS!

All month we will be celebrating Jazz and The people that keep it going, especially The Drummers!  Stay Tuned! Follow us Today

SPECIAL EVENT by Hipster Sanctuary.Com

Celebrating 17 years  of covering and extending the Legacy.

DFQ is Celebrating 20 years as a Jazz Group

SATURDAY APRIL 18  7-9 pm   $15 admission at door

JAZZ SPOKEN HERE

DALE FIELDER QUARTET & ROBERT J. CARMACK

Jazz and spoken word performances

@ KINGSTON CAFE 333 FAIR OAKS Ave.
Off DEL MAR Ave. PASADENA, CALIF
SATURDAY APRIL 18 2015 7pm to 9pm
$15 admission (at door only) Limited Seating
DALE FIELDER QUARTET & ROBERT J. CARMACK

bobby w shades and black undershirt
Robert J. Carmack journalist,producer,writer, actor, poet, music archivist

ja-ijd-jamLG

Dale fielder  sax orange shirt
Dale Fielder, Band leader, musician, ethnomusicologist,producer and educator

REASONS TO SUPPORT DEXTER GORDON PARK IN LEIMERT VILLAGE – LOS ANGELES


EDITORIAL by Eric WATTREE  #wattreechronicles  #blues2jazzguy

dexter gordon Black white

SAVE OUR LEGACY
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As most people in Los Angeles know, the powers that be are in the process of gentrifying Leimert Park much like they’re doing in Harlem, New York. But what many in the community fail to realize is when they pave over communities, they pave over Black history as well. That’s why we have to have a “Black History Month” to recall the contributions that Black people have made to this nation. That shouldn’t be necessary. Black history should be alive all around us seven days a week and throughout the year. Our children should be drenched in it on a daily basis just like White kids.

Washington, D.C. is called Washington, and nearly every street, town, city, and state in this country are named as they are so we’ll be completely immersed in White history. And the fact that those names don’t reflect who we are as Black people is one of the reasons that Black history is so obscure and many of our Black children lack self-esteem. We’ve got to change that. For that reason, I suggest that we mount a campaign to change the name of “Leimert Park” to “Dexter Gordon Park.”

DexterGordonvery large pix
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Leimert Park is renown all over the world for being Los Angeles’ principle center of Black art, so before this gentrification takes place, it should be renamed to reflect that reality, and no artist is more deserving, or more perfectly suited for the honor of having Leimert renamed after him than Saxophonist, Dexter Gordon. Dexter, along with drummer Billy Higgins (who played with Dexter), are two of the greatest artists that Los Angeles has ever produced – in fact, two of the greatest artists who’s ever lived. They disseminated Jazz (America’s greatest Art form) all over the world, and they’ve brought our city great notority and recognition as a mecca for genius, beauty, and excellence all around the globe. But due to the tradition of racism inherent to American society, these two great men are recognized virtually everywhere in the world EXCEPT right here in the United States. Elvis has been memorialized, so why not Dexter, and why not Billy? Thus, we shouldn’t just sit quietly back and allow the contributions to humanity of these two artistic giants to be paved over by American history – especially here in Los Angeles.
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If we have to fight, so be it. We’ve failed to do that in the past. That’s why the average Black person doesn’t know that the only reason the world can read this message over their computer is because of the brilliance of Dr. Mark Dean, a Black man, who was one of the principle inventors of the personal computer, or Henry T. Sampson, who invented the gamma-electric cell, making cell phones possible. These two Black men have had a pronounced impact on the lives of every person in the civilized world. Our children should know that, because that is a part of their legacy, and they should know about Dexter Gordon and Billy Higgins as well.

billy-higgins color pix -thumb
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I was in Leimert Park the other night, and it made my eyes moist just witnessing the beauty of our people at their best, and at their most artistic. It’s a wonderful thing to see Black people coming together in celebration of who we are, and we should protect that, so we should make Billy Higgins’ “World Stage” a historic landmark, and place statues of both Dexter and Billy in the park itself in recognition of who they WERE, and who we ARE. And we shouldn’t stop there. We should continue on to rename the streets in and around Leimert Park after major contributors to our culture. For example, Vernon Ave., between Alameda and Crenshaw, should be renamed “Dubois Ave,” and Degnan, between the park and 43rd Street, renamed “Eric Dolphy Dr.” Because we are what we think, and that will help our young people, and posterity, to understand our legacy, and our significance as a people.
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We always complain about White supremacy, but we never do those things that are necessary to dismantle it, and in order to begin to dismantle it, we MUST do things like this in recognition of the excellence within our community and to bring a sense of pride to our young people. We must leave no stone unturned to make it impossible for us to be depicted as a frivolous people without a past. We’ve got to wake up and get on top of these sort of things – if not for ourselves, for the love of our children, because they too will become what they think.
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Legacy
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Neither scholar nor the head of state,
The most common of men seems to be my fate;
A life blistered with struggle and constant need,
As my legacy to man I bequeath my seed.
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More fertile, more sturdy these ones than I,
This withered old vine left fallow and dry;
The nectar of their roots lie dormant still,
But through their fruit, I’ll be revealed.
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So let us take a moment to think beyond the moment, and think of the dignity and self-esteem of Black children who are yet unborn, just as Dex, and many others, thought about you.
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follow Eric Wattree on this Blog for Editorials, & “Beneath the Spin ” Jazz series

Eric Wattree