JAZZ LEGENDARY VIBIST BOBBY HUTCHERSON 75 HAS PASSED 1941 – 2016


posted by Robert J. Carmack

Bobby Hutcherson in suit  color pix

 

 

 

 

Bobby Hutcherson:1941-2016 The most accomplished vibraphonist and composer to emerge in the latter half of the 20th Century,has passed at age 75 Monday, August 15th. Bobby Hutcherson is survived by a wife and a bevy of family and close friends all grieving.

Hutcherson redefined the role of the Vibraphone in modern jazz.

A retrospective follow-up piece by music journalist and jazz historian, Robert J. Carmack  coming soon to Hipster Sanctuary.Com .

Bobby hutcherson 2 color in vest

 

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RETURN OF THE GRASSROOTS HIP-NOSIS:MUSIC OF BOBBY HUTCHERSON & JACKIE McLEAN


ROBERT J. CARMACK  presents

NIGHT OF THE GRASSROOTS HIP-NOSIS: an Evening  of Spoken Word ~Jazz Music of Bobby Hutcherson & Jackie McLean .

Bobby Hutcherson
Bobby Hutcherson

 

Jackie McLean
Jackie McLean

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY  JULY 30 @ 8PM

The WORLD STAGE PERFORMANCE GALLERY

4321 Degnan Blvd.

Leimert Park Village(LA,Calif. 90008)

Featuring  Plight (Jazz/Spoken Word Ensemble)

Guest Poet; TU’NOOK

Special Guest: Dale Fielder – saxophones

Tickets:early bird special before July 15th $15 (limited seating) afterwards $20 in advance $25 at door ~ Information regarding show or tickets contact Robert J. Carmack 951-840-7120

INTRODUCING  PLIGHT Jazz Ensemble

Plight Pixs Robert Rasta hat
Robert J. Carmack Leader/Poet/producer

 

Bobby West piano/music dir.
Bobby West piano/music dir.

 

 

Derf Reklaw-woodwinds/percussion
Derf Reklaw-woodwinds/percussion

 

 

 

 

Reggie Carson-Bassist
Reggie Carson-Bassist

 

Dale Fielder-saxophones
Dale Fielder- saxophones
Tu'Nook
TU’NOOK – Poet

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drums by Cornell Fauler(picture not available)

The music is a mixture of spoken word and jazz integrated into the compositions of iconic jazz artists Bobby Hutcherson and Jackie McLean. During the late 1950s and mid-1960s the record label, Blue Note churned out stellar music by saxophonist Jackie McLean. Stepping out of the shadows of Yardbird Parker and creating his own persona on alto, Jackie blazed his own unique trail that often borderlined on the Avant Garde.

His music held elements of bebop & swinging Blues numbers that captured the heart and soul of the hip new audiences that gravitated toward what became later known as, Hard-Bop.        An eclectic mixture of truly adventurous, soulful artistry,while still retaining their integrity as  jazz musicians.

Bobby Hutcherson is another bright spot of post bop masters to emerged onto the scene in the early 60s as a sideman to other peers and Heavyweights like Eric Dolphy. He grew into a first call vibist, embracing all of the pioneer’s skills on his instrument before him..like “Hamp”, “Bags” and Red Norvo to name a few.

After some very convincing recording sessions on Blue Note with other artists, it was not long before Hutcherson was commanding his own groups and recording sessions with authentic success.

Robert J. Carmack ,a jazz historian and archivist has chosen eight compositions. Four of which Carmack has written original poems that mesh with the songs that beckons a time in jazz history where, Poets and musicians often performed together.

The New York Greenwich Village and San Francisco “Beat Generation” hot spots often spawned great writers and poets including, the late poet laureate, Amiri Baraka (Leroi Jones).

Plight Playlist; McLean  recordings~Riff Raff(Destination Out) Hipnosis(Hipnosis),Plight(Action) Blues in a Jiff (Vertigo)

Bobby Hutcherson Recordings~Night in Barcelona(San Francisco),Medina (Medina),Slow Change(Now!)Little B’s Poem(several albums).

The venue was chosen because of the long-standing history of these two giants working with the late founding member,Billy Higgins. Higgins was one of the most recorded drummer in jazz history and in-house drummer on Blue Note Records during its Jazz hey day of 1959-mid-1970s.

Carmack met Higgins at the early stages of the World Stage’s development while hanging out in the many workshops and performances. Robert witnessed Billy bring through Jazz icon after icon to the Leimert Park Village “digs”.

Many of these Legends would often stop through while in town for gigs ,conduct workshops or talk to young musicians who were struggling with their craft. Higgins was very approachable and would act as Jazz Griot in the artist community of Los Angeles.  Higgins grew up as a kid on the “Eastside” of Los Angeles. As a young man ,he played with great musicians like Don Cherry, John Coltrane, Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, Dexter Gordon, Ornette Coleman, Phineas Newborn, Sonny Criss, Gerald Wilson and others.

The World Stage is monumental in the development of this new wave of musicians, writers and artists in general. while they offer writing classes,jazz workshops, music presentations by student-level performers , professionals still participate in a great deal of their activities as a “passing of the baton by those who like to give back , just as their pioneer founders Higgins and poet laureate Kamau Daaood did over 25 years ago. Gone but not forgotten, a strong “tip of the hat” to the late great World Stage contributors, Horace Tapscott and Nate Morgan. Thanks to the other faceless but important contributors. The Legacy continues today  as the Kamasi Washingtons sax, Drummer Willie Jones III, Saxophonist Dale Fielder, bassist Marcus Shelby keeps repeating over and over.

posted by Kamaad Tauhid  #@blues2jazzguy

 

 

 

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CELEBRATING BLACK MUSIC MONTH WITH LEGEND BIG BLACK ~ PERCUSSIONIST


posted by Robert J. Carmack  #blues2jazzguy

shown: music journalist/producer Robert J. Carmack with drummer Big Black
shown: music journalist/producer Robert J. Carmack with drummer Big Black – photos by Emmett Williams

 

 

 

Danny “Big Black” Rey got its nickname “Big Black” from an older brother because of his interest in drums.  During his high school years on the radio, the Conga in the Cuban music had heard he was interested in the instrument and traveled to Florida and the Bahamas , where he spent five years. There he played with Lord Fleas Calypso band met at Fish Ray and Johnny “Slick” Engraham and looked at Calypso Eddy Trio with Sam and Role . In Miami, he worked at Jack Contanzo, Moe Koffman and the Contemporary Jazz Orchestra, before he formed a band with trumpeter Billy Cook and found private access to the fusion of Caribbean and Jazz rhythms.

In the early 1960s, he moved to New York City, where he worked in the bands of Freddie Hubbard (Night of the Cookers) and Randy Weston and also played with the likes of musicians Ray Bryant, Johnny Barracuda, Junior Cook and Eric Dolphy was heard. In 1965 he was in the Caribbean Pavilion of World Expo. Also, in that same year, he performed with Dizzy Gillespie at the Newport Jazz Festival. He got a record deal and produced four of his own albums prior to 1972, where he partially pushed the envelope in the area of African rhythms in music. He had a short stint as a member of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band . Big Black even spent sometime as an actor of supporting roles in TV shows and films.   A tremendous musician and sideman,eclectic icon in Jazz, performed many times outside the mainstream as Sun Ra, B.B. King, Charles Tolliver , and even played music during the World Cup campaign with Muhammad Ali.  Big Black worked as musical director on several projects by Randy Weston african themed recordings. But my favorite of all Big Black collaborations was his work with Hugh Masakela starting in the mid 1960s(1966) Masakela, Big Black ,Henry the Skipper” Franklin, Larry Willis and all appeared in a historic Concert in WATTS(LA california) as part of the very First WATTS Festival in August of 1966, coming just one year later after one of the worst Race riots in LA history.

This writer was there to witness that concert as a young 15-year-old budding jazz musician. Masakela was making his West Coast debut in Los Angeles with tremendous success to follow after that first concert at a local high school. It was good to talk over old days with one of the all-time greats on percussions. He still enjoys the passion & skills to elevate the room with precision-like rhythms and cadences.

more info on Big Black: http://www.bigblackmusic.com/

 

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THE CREATORS MASTERPLAN SHINED AT CATALINA’S JAZZ BAR


Pharoah Sanders
Pharoah Sanders -photos by Robert Hill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday night June 11, The amped up audiences from the two sets were fully engaged and electrified by Pharoah Sanders with the Harold Mabern Trio.  A rare Southern California appearance by Harold Mabern, the bluesy,swinging pianist most known from his Blue Note hey-days of Lee Morgan and the like.

Over the last 15 plus years, he’s been leading his own series of jazz groups out of New York while being long time sideman with saxophonist Eric Alexander. Both have healthy discography to show for it. The powerful and unique combination of Pharoah Sanders with Harold Mabern was a concept to offer two great legends for the price of one . Apparently, the idea was quite successful as the audiences over the three day stint were quite full. Each veteran got their opportunities to delve into the Tune Books for rock solid gems like Pharoah’s,The Creator Has a Masterplan or Rakin’ and Scrapin’ by Mabern, along with a great rendition of My Favorite Things ,paying homage to the great John Coltrane which Pharoah began his career with over 50 years ago. posted by Robert J. Carmack #blues2jazzguy

Harold Mabern @ Catalina's
Harold Mabern @ Catalina’s

 

 

 

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RAKIN’ AND SCRAPIN’ AT CATALINA’S : PHAROAH SANDERS with HAROLD MABERN


Pharoah_Sanders 901x1024posted by @blues2jazzguy

Pharoah Sanders possesses one of the most distinctive tenor saxophone sounds in jazz. Harmonically rich and heavy with overtones, Sanders’ sound can be as raw and abrasive as it is possible for a saxophonist to produce. Yet, Sanders is highly regarded to the point of reverence by a great many jazz fans. Although he made his name with expressionistic, nearly anarchic free jazz in John Coltrane’s late ensembles of the mid-’60s, Sanders’ later music is guided by more graceful concerns.

The hallmarks of Sanders’ playing at that time were naked aggression and unrestrained passion. In the years after Coltrane’s death, however, Sanders explored other, somewhat gentler and perhaps more cerebral avenues — without, it should be added, sacrificing any of the intensity that defined his work as an apprentice to Coltrane.

 

Harold Mabern-Piano
Harold Mabern – Master Pianist  Harold Mabern, one of jazz’s most enduring and dazzlingly skilled pianists, was born in Memphis, a city that produced saxophonists George Coleman and Charles Lloyd, pianist Phineas Newborn Jr. and trumpeter Booker Little. He was an unsung hero of the 1960s hardbop scene, performing and recording with many of its finest artists, and only in recent years has he begun to garner appreciation for his long-running legacy in jazz and the understated power of his talent; as critic Gary Giddins has written, “With the wind at his back, he can sound like an ocean roar.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During his over half-century on the scene as sideman and leader, he has played and recorded with such greats as Lee Morgan, Sonny Rollins, Hank Mobley, Freddie Hubbard and Miles Davis, just to name a few. “I was never concerned with being a leader, I just always wanted to be the best sideman I could be. Be in the background so you can shine through.

Tickets on sale online  call ahead for Reservations

JUNE 9th – JUNE 11th    THREE DAYS ONLY

 Catalina Bar & Grill · $$
Intimate music venue features the biggest names in jazz & serves drinks, plus Italian-American fare.
Address: 6725 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90028
Phone: (323) 466-2210

PHILLY PRODIGAL SON McCOY TYNER HONORED BY MAYOR NUTTER & CITY


posted by  Robert J. Carmack   #@blues2jazzguy

McCoy TYner-600

HE’S WIDELY considered one of the most influential jazz pianists of the 20th century, and yesterday McCoy Tyner was given the keys to the city – or our equivalent, a brass, mini Liberty Bell.

Mayor Nutter recognized Tyner as the 2015 Jazz Legend Honoree during the fifth annual Philadelphia Jazz Appreciation Month, which celebrates Philly’s jazz history with musical events throughout April.

Tyner, originally from West Philly, is an icon in the jazz community, and has performed alongside musical greats such as John Coltrane, Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie. He has won four Grammys and has released nearly 80 albums under his name.

“It’s wonderful to be back home in Philadelphia,” said Tyner, 76, who has spent recent years living in New York.

mcCoy Tyner  & BOBBY
Shown: Publicist Robert J. Carmack with legendary pianist McCoy Tyner in San Francisco circa 2002

“I would like to thank the mayor and the people of this great city for making this possible for me. No matter where I am in the world, Philadelphia always has a special place in my heart.”

Nutter called Philly “the music town of the United States of America,” to raucous applause from an audience of musicians. “McCoy has changed the way everyone after him has played the piano,” said local Grammy-winning record-label owner, producer and composer Aaron Levinson.

“His percussive approach and sense of harmony signaled a new frontier for the instrument. And his embrace of African, Asian and Afro-Cuban ideas puts him in the league of Duke Ellington. Philadelphia can claim one of the giants of all time, and I applaud our mayor for making this happen.”

Barons of Hard Bop Piano: One Night Only Lincoln Center Jazz


Jazz Piano Summit: Cedar Walton & Barry Harris

The Allen Room at Jazz at Lincoln Center     New York City, N.Y.

jazz-piano-sumit-920Two jazz piano greats, Cedar Walton and Barry Harris, share the stage for what promises to be one great night of music. Best known for his hard bop style, Walton made a name for himself early on performing in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, alongside Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard. He’s also the composer of several jazz standards, such as “Firm Roots, “Bolivia,” “Cedar’s Blues” and “Fantasy in D” (aka “Ugetsu”). Barry Harris’ bebop stylings have been heard jamming with such luminaries as Cannonball Adderley, Coleman Hawkins and Dexter Gordon. Extremely prolific, Harris has recorded 19 albums as a lead artist and has been honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. These two piano legends will be joined by Buster Williams on bass and Willie Jones III on drums.

Follow this story with #Bop Barons on twitter @blues2jazzguy

TWO SHOWS ONLY    SATURDAY,  JUNE 22   7:30pm   &  9:30pm