SHANA TUCKER DEBUT AT DETROIT’S CLIFF BELLS ~ ONE NIGHT ONLY


posted by Robert J. Carmack  #@blues2jazzguy

Shana Tucker Chamber Soul artist

Shana Tucker Chamber Soul artist

shanatucker_credit

The lovely and talented singer-multi-instrumentalist, Shana Tucker makes her first trip into the motor city,binging her special brand of Chamber Soul to

CLIFF BELL’S
Thursday, October 22, 2015       @ 8 & 9:30 PM
2030 Park Avenue, Detroit MI 48226

———————————————————–

CLIFF BELL’S, the historic downtown jazz club (a few blocks from the Windsor Tunnel). Supported by a stellar rhythm section, Detroit’s Finest: Jon Dixon (piano/keys), Kamau (bass), and Alex White (drums), it’s all going down this THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, with two sets at 8:00 and 9:30 PM..

~ The Bill Heid Piano Trio ~

“Her voice alone would support a career. What makes Tucker special is her adherence to the cello, boldly taking the instrument into new territory.” -INDYWEEK.COM

Shana Tucker is a singer-songwriter and cellist who credits her genre-bending ChamberSoul™ journey to the influences of her jazz and classical roots, interwoven with 80’s & 90’s pop music, movie soundtracks, and world music.

Shana Tucker Detroit

Shana’s journey as a solo artist began in 2009, when she arrived in Durham, NC and quickly became a staple in the vibrant Triangle music scene. INDYWEEK.COM  writes, “Indeed, crossovers and connections are a central theme of Tucker’s career, from the cello’s liminal range to her interests in various genres.

Her debut album SHiNE corrodes the music industry boundaries between classical, jazz, folk, R&B and soul. Triangle Arts & Entertainment notes Shana as “a complex musician who offers not only a world-class voice that rivals that of Cleo Laine or Diana Krall, but also is an accomplished cellist…able to compete with musicians who make their living simply by playing one instrument…”she carves out a space that is intrinsically hers”.

http://www.shanatucker.com/

Advertisements

HAPPY 85 TO JAZZ LEGENDARY SAXOPHONIST SONNY ROLLINS !


posted by robert j. carmack  #@blues2jazzguy

SONNY ROLLINS  SEPTEMBER 7 1930

Sonny Rollins MOHAWK

Sonny Rollins in 1959 w Mohawk

Sonny Mohawk 3 Rollins

Prestige Records Golden Sonny Rollins

Sonny Rollins turned 85 years old today . its hard to believe ,not because of his age, but, in spite of his age. He still holds court somewhere in the world on major stages blowing long, multi-note phrases, swinging  violently on the most miniscule of sub-themes set up by his own improvisations. Very few things are more exciting than watching and listening to Sonny Rollins in Beast mode. My first experience seeing and hearing him was as a curious child watching 1950s television, that just happened to have a jazz band playing that night. I saw this really cool looking black man with a shiny horn , sun glasses and a Mohawk. I think it was Steve Allen or Jack Parr’s version of the The Tonight Show.    Sonny Rollins was more than a jazz musician, he was a mentor to other jazz musicians, cultural and fashion icon whose influences went beyond the bandstand as well. He was the first black man I ever saw with a Mohawk (1959)..Quite the dresser on stage when he wanted to, He was the first I ever saw with clean-shaved head(1960s) and diamond-studded Ascot.

My first live Sonny Rollins concert, I was now 21 and living in Los Angeles 1971, he was performing at the museum of modern Art outside.. I watched with such wide-eyed delight as he swung so hard on unbelievable tempos, countered that with such tender,velvety arpeggios like he did on such classics as, I Can’t Get Started or Don’t Blame Me. Fast-forward to late 1990s and I’m now living in Atlanta Georgia watching a much older man with full head of snow-white hair and full beard, with a very nice suit with red “Chuck Taylor” Converse basketball shoes.  This time his band personnel was young guys except for his long-time bassist Bob Cranshaw. The results were still the same…long-winded solos on jazz standards and some west indian folk songs    paying homage to Rollins’ West Indian roots.

Sonny at Newport 2001

Sonny at Newport 2001

This man has appeared in countless numbers of countries on even more super numbers of stages,over (7) seven decades of playing professionally and like a great Rolls Royce classic, even though high milage, He still purrs and runs like new.

Well done sir! Happy Birthday Sonny, keep coming back!

WELCOME JAZZ APPRECIATION MONTH: DRUMMER BIG SID CATLETT


posted by Robert J. Carmack  #@blues2jazzguy

First in our “Give The Drummer Sum Series” on iconic and jazz ‘s greatest Drummers in our opinion. BIG SID  CATLETT

Sid_Catlett,_New_York,,_ca._Mar._1947_(William_P._Gottlieb_01181)Big Sid Catlett
(1910 – 1951)

“Big Sid” Catlett was one of the most flexible drummers in the history of jazz. On one hand,Catlett was skilled enough in the pre-modern styles to be Louis Armstrong’s favorite
percussionist; on the other, Catlett’s powerful swing and generous adaptability allowed him to play commendably on the early Parker/Gillespie bop sides. Catlett excelled particularly as a combo drummer in the swing era.

BigSidCatlett01 BE Bop  and Dizzy

A sensitive player possessing great drive and spirit, he was every bit the equal of such better-known contemporaries as Jo Jones or Gene Krupa.

As a child in Chicago, Catlett played the piano and learned the rudiments of drumming. His first professional gig was with Darnell Howard in 1928. Catlett played with other undistinguished Chicago bands before moving to New York in 1930. There he became a hired gun, working and recording with Benny Carter (1932), McKinney’s Cotton Pickers (1934-1935), Fletcher Henderson (1936),  and Don Redman (1936-1938). In the late ’30s and early ’40s Catlett worked and played endlessly, appearing on countless recording sessions with a staggeringly wide variety of musicians.

BigSidCatlett13 SATCHMO DRUM

Big Sid Catlett Appearing as Louis Armstrong’s personal drummer of choice

Catlett became Louis Armstrong’s drummer of choice, from 1938 –
1942 he was featured with Pops’ big band. In 1941, he played with a particularly excellent
Benny Goodman big band that also included trumpeters Billy Butterfield and           Cootie Williams.

The advent of bebop appeared not to trouble him and if he never fully adapted his style he certainly gave his front-line colleagues few problems. Though Catlett was not a bebop drummer per se, he made an effort to accommodate the new music. He played on one of the first bop recording dates in 1945, a session that produced the classic early Gillespie/Parker sides.

In the early ’40s Catlett was a member of the superb Teddy Wilson Sextet. He also joined Duke Ellington briefly in 1945. Catlett led his own bands throughout the ’40s, until he joined Louis Armstrong’s All-Stars in 1947.He remained with Armstrong until 1949 when the years of all-night jam sessions began to catch up with him.

Catlett was forced to quit touring in 1949 due to ill health, but he continued to play, becoming the house drummer at a Chicago club, Jazz, Ltd. He also worked with Eddie Condon and John Kirby in New York in his final years. In early 1951 Catlett suffered from a bout of pneumonia and in March, he collapsed and died of a heart attack while visiting friends backstage at a Oran “Hot Lips” Page benefit concert at the Chicago Opera House.

BigSidCatlett15

Although a brilliant technician, Catlett chose to play in a deceptively simple style. With the fleet,smoothly-swinging Wilson sextet he was discreet and self-effacing; with Goodman he rolled the band remorselessly onward, with Armstrong he gave each of his fellow musicians an individualized accompaniment that defied them not to swing. Instantly identifiable, especially through his thundercrack rimshots, Catlett always swung mightily.

On stage, he was a spectacular showman, clothing his massive frame in green plaid suits, tossing his sticks high in
the air during solos and generally enjoying himself.

Enjoy the month of April with the HIPSTER!!

Paying Tribute To Big Bruh Sweet Lou: WE Are One


lou-wilson

January 7 date is quickly approaching and marking the  first year since the passing of  Elder Wilson brother, Sweet Lou. WILSON was a founding member of funk group MANDRILL. After four decades in the music business, the Mandrill band is still thrilling audiences world wide. 2014 is no different  with the Wilson Brothers developing new & interesting projects for the new year. Sweet Lou was born in Panama but, moved with his family to Brooklyn in 1968. There, along with brothers RIC and CARLOS they put together the band MANDRILL for which they formed the brass section and they were also featured vocalists. LOU WILSON passed away from  cardiac arrest. He was 71 at the time of his death.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXHE0sEUF7U

Bobby & Lou

One of the special projects that’s drawing lots of attention is the Lou Wilson Memorial Fund.

To honor the musical vision established by Lou and the Wilson Brothers, a charitable fund is being created in Lou’s name to give children an opportunity to thrive in the arts. This fund-under Mandrill‘s umbrella organization Mosaic Fusion-will formalize and extend that legacy.

Throughout the years, the Wilson Brothers have supported and encouraged children around the world who are pursuing their highest good in the arts, especially music. The surviving brothers want to continue that support because ,they know the arts can help youngsters develop skills and self-esteem necessary to make positive decisions for themselves .. most importantly, lasting contributions to their communities.

Please make your donation to The Lou Wilson Memorial Fund. The tax-exempt status for Mosaic Fusion is pending. You will receive a receipt and letter of appreciation from the Wilson Brothers. Visit the website of Mandrill  and learn more about whats happening with Mandrill  or make a donation to The Lou Wilson Memorial Fund.   http://mandrillmusic.com   

sweet Lou wilson  david

Remembering LOU : Hum a song, play a drum or say a prayer in remembrance of him”.

What a Difference a Day Makes:Happy Birthday Dinah Washington


posted by Robert J. Carmack    Ruth Lee Jones, aka Dinah Washington, was born on August 29, 1924. She was a singer and pianist, who has been cited as “the most popular black female recording artist of the 1950s”. Primarily a jazz vocalist, she performed and recorded in a wide variety of styles including blues, R&B, and traditional pop music, and gave herself the title, “Queen of the Blues”. She’s a 1986 inductee of the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993.

Dinah elegant

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Lee Jones was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and moved to Chicago as a child. She became deeply involved in gospel and played piano for the choir in St. Luke’s Baptist Church while still in elementary school. She sang gospel music in church and played piano, directing her church choir in her teens and being a member of the Sallie Martin Gospel Singers. She sang lead with the first female gospel singers formed by Ms. Martin, who was co-founder of the Gospel Singers Convention. Her involvement with the gospel choir occurred after she won an amateur contest at Chicago’s Regal Theater where she sang “I Can’t Face the Music”.

By 1941-42 she was performing in such Chicago clubs as Dave’s Rhumboogie and the Downbeat Room of the Sherman Hotel with Fats Waller. She was playing the Three Deuces, a jazz club, when a friend took her to hear Billie Holiday at the Garrick Stage Bar. Joe Sherman was so impressed with her singing of “I Understand”, backed by the Cats and the Fiddle, who were appearing in the Garrick’s upstairs room, that he hired her. During her year at the Garrick – she sang upstairs while Holiday performed in the downstairs room – she acquired the name by which she became known. She credited Joe Sherman with suggesting the change from Ruth Jones, made before Lionel Hampton came to hear Dinah at the Garrick. Hampton’s visit brought an offer, and Washington worked as his female band vocalist.

She made her recording debut for the Keynote label with “Evil Gal Blues”, written by Leonard Feather and backed by Hampton and musicians from his band, including Joe Morris (trumpet) and Milt Buckner (piano). Both that record and its follow-up, “Salty Papa Blues”, made Billboard’s “Harlem Hit Parade” in 1944.

She stayed with Hampton’s band until 1946 and, after the Keynote label folded, signed with Mercury Records as  solo singer. Her first record for Mercury, a version of Fats Waller’s “Ain’t Misbehavin‘”, was another hit. Between 1948 and 1955, she had 27 R&B top ten hits, making her one of the most popular and successful singers of the period. Both “Am I Asking Too Much” (1948) and “Baby Get Lost” (1949) reached Number 1 on the R&B chart, and her version of “I Wanna Be Loved” (1950) crossed over to reach Number 22 on the US pop chart. Her hit recordings included blues, standards, novelties, pop covers, and even a version of Hank Williams’ “Cold, Cold Heart” (R&B Number 3, 1951). At the same time as her biggest popular success, she also recorded sessions with many leading jazz musicians, including Clifford Brown and Clark Terry on the album Dinah Jams (1954), and also recorded with Cannonball Adderley and Ben Webster.  dinah Washington
In 1959, she had her first top ten pop hit, with a version of “What a Diff’rence a Day Makes”, which made Number 4 on the US pop chart. Her band at that time included arranger Belford Hendricks, with Kenny Burrell (guitar), Joe Zawinul (piano), and Panama Francis (drums). She followed it up with a version of Nat “King” Cole’s “Unforgettable”, and then two highly successful duets in 1960 with Brook Benton, “Baby (You’ve Got What It Takes)” (No. 5 Pop, No. 1 R&B) and “A Rockin’ Good Way (To Mess Around and Fall in Love)” (No. 7 Pop, No. 1 R&B). Her last big hit was “September in the Rain” in 1961 (No. 23 Pop, No. 5 R&B).

Washington was well known for singing torch songs. In 1962, Dinah hired a male backing trio called the Allegros, consisting of Jimmy Thomas on drums, Earl Edwards on sax, and Jimmy Sigler on organ. Edwards was eventually replaced on sax by John Payne. A Variety writer praised their vocals as “effective choruses”.

Washington’s achievements included appearances at the Newport Jazz Festival (1955–59), the Randalls Island Jazz Festival in New York City (1959), and the International Jazz Festival in Washington D.C. (1962), frequent gigs at Birdland (1958, 1961–62), and performances in 1963 with Count Basie and Duke Ellington. Performing at the London Palladium, with Queen Elizabeth sitting in a box, Washington told the audience: “There is but one Heaven, one Hell, one queen, and your Elizabeth is an imposter.”

Washington married seven times. Her husbands were John Young (1942–43), George Jenkins (1946), Robert Grayson (1947), bassist and bandleader Walter Buchanan (1950), saxophonist Eddie Chamblee (1957), Rafael Campos (1961), and pro-football player Dick “Night Train” Lane (1963).  She had two sons: George Kenneth Jenkins and Robert Grayson.

dinah stamp

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=so6Y1RJcPAI
Washington was an outspoken unapologetic liberal Democrat. She once said, “I am who I am and I know what I know. I’m a Democrat plain and simple, always have been. I’d never vote for a Republican because in my opinion they don’t have what it takes to run any kind of private or public office. That’s all.”

Early morning of December 14, 1963, Washington’s seventh husband, Dick Lane went to sleep with his wife, later he found her slumped over and non-responsive. She was pronounced dead at the scene. An autopsy later showed a lethal combination of secobarbital and amobarbital, which contributed to her death at the age of 39. She’s rests in peace at the Burr Oak Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois.

RETRO: BO DIDDLEY BLUES LEGEND GONE THOUGH NOT FORGOTTEN


Bo Diddley 35% (1)  Remembering Bo Diddley:  posted by  Phillip Moore                                                                               
One of my favorite annual events  is the Austin Record Convention, one of the largest Record Collectors & Memorabilia exhibit in the world. 1993 would prove very special in my quest to grow my personal memorabilia pieces and buy key vinyl records and posters for the Records Store I’d managed  for over a decade. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jrIK7YB0tE

Meeting  Rock & Roll pioneer Bo Diddley was not on my mind when I woke up that morning in 1993.  One of the most amazing thing that ever happened to me, and little did I know I would have the meeting of my life. As I was making my way around the huge event looking, and gazing at all sorts of memorabilia .I locked in on a man over to the side signing posters,books & album jackets , He had a familiar face , as I got closer, the identifying “horn-rim” glasses. It was Bo Diddley himself. Chatting with the legend, We talked about Chess Records,The Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco and Bill Graham.He had nothing but good things to say about Graham.

Besides getting his personal autograph, I was there to buy records and other items for the record store I managed everyday. while recalling a time he played at the San Francisco landmark Concert venue, I laid down a poster from that era and he quickly remembered..like a light bulb snapping on in a dark room. Looking over the classic poster he said”I still can’t read my name on this.”

” Bo Diddley is the man!!” he will always have my respect.whether its for being an innovator in Rhythm& Blues music,the custom guitar, or, for standing up to Ed Sullivan  to not dilute his music performance by playing a song by Ernie Ford, “16 Tons” .  Diddley  recorded on Chess Records from 1955 to 1976.

Oddly enough, in the late 80s, Bo recorded a live album with Ron Wood of the “Rolling Stones” and even toured with Ronnie Wood.

With his sound influencing several generations of musical stars, Bo was also a ground-breaker with women  musicians in his regular band. they weren’t just eye-candy, these ladies could play hard. The Duchess,Lady Bo ,Cookie and Debbie Hastings,all were alumni of the Do Diddley band over the five decades plus he performed.

Bo was one of the nicest people I’ve ever met. Sadly after a long battle with bad health, Bo  Diddley passed  in 2008.

It was reported his last words were,  “I am gonna  go to heaven” . Let us never  forget this man and every thing he did for music and in life.

MEMBERS ONLY:R&B Soul Singer Bobby Blue Bland Laid To Rest


Boby Bland   tint BlueLion Of The Blues: Celebrated And Laid To Rest  posted by Robert J. Carmack

MEMPHIS – Funeral services for soul-blues singer Bobby “Blue” Bland were held Thursday, June 27, at First Baptist Church in Memphis ,Tenn. Family, friends, colleagues and dignitaries from near and far gathered at First Baptist Church in Memphis to deliver Bland’s praises, listen to his tunes, and mark the passing of a Memphis music giant. The 2 1/2-hour memorial proved a stirring celebration of the life of the veteran R&B singer, who died Sunday June 23, age 83 at his home in Germantown, Tenn. #MEMBERS ONLY

The Bland family decided to allow the public to “share in the celebration” of the singer’s life by streaming the services live. It was not one, but a multitude of Bobby “Blue” Blands’ who were hailed and mourned during the  funeral services at First Baptist on Thursday.To some, he was the “pearl of the blues world”; others, a singer whose artistry was not limited by any single genre or form, but always a man with an abundance of charisma. Bland was remembered as a devoted husband, father and grandfather, but most of all a good friend;to those whom he knew and loved him.

The Blues singer’s casket was flanked by a bevy of colorful wreaths, family members, including  wife, Willie Mae, at the front. A procession of speakers came to the church’s pulpit to tell the story of his life and legacy.Spearheaded by the Rev. Jesse Jackson , as he spoke about his long relationship with the singer, which began five decades ago in South Carolina. Bobby--Blue--Bland-jpg formal NowHe and his wife were just newlyweds when they went to see Blue Bland perform. “For more than 50 years he’s remained relevant..Bobby was a singer, but no one adjective is enough,” said Jackson. “Validated by his fans and peers, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, the Allman Brothers and Elvis Presley, all of them looked up to Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland.”

“Today, death has been robbed,” continued Jackson. “It has taken his frail body, but has not taken the crown prince of melodic music. You belong to us forever, Bobby.”

Former Stax Records executive/producer, Al Bell talked in detail about Bland’s musical contributions, charting his career from his earliest Duke sessions to his ’70s work on ABC, to his later efforts for Mississippi’s Malaco Records. Bell noted that though all the years, changes and albums, the singular spirit in Bland always shined through. “I love the spirit that lived in Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland. And the spirit that lived in that body influenced us through its music, its thoughts, its contemplations and considerations for 83 years,” said Bell. “What a blessing!”

“Even though Bobby Bland is gone, you still can experience that spirit by just listening to his recorded music. You will experience the spirit, the care and love, the power and the glory.”  In attendence at the services were, local politicos who also paid their respects, with former Congressman Harold Ford Sr. and Shelby County Mayor, Mark Luttrell among those paying homage.

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton also evoked one of Bland’s signature tunes while reflecting on his passing. “Bobby’s soul had to move,” said Herenton. “You know, Bobby left us with a song: ‘Further on Up the Road.’ Well, just a few days ago, Bobby moved a little further on up the road.”

Fellow musicians, including Stax songwriter David Porter, also shared personal insights. Porter told how he and his partner Isaac Hayes included a winking tribute in their classic 1967 hit “Soul Man”, by having Sam & Dave singer Sam Moore do a couple of Bland’s signature vocal “squalls” on the track.

Blues Foundation president Jay Sieleman reflected on Bland’s enduring musical impact, recalling how just this spring the singer was given the state of Tennessee’s highest cultural honor, the Distinguished Artist Award. While the recognition is typically reserved for those in the “fine arts” category, Sieleman noted that Bland represented the finest in any art form, praising him for his “exceptional talent and creativity.”

The eulogy, delivered by pastor Keith Norman, closed a program filled with music, including recordings of Bland’s own work, as well as rousing performances by gospel vocalist Deborah Manning-Thomas, Stax star Shirley Brown and Chicago soul singer and Hi Records artist Otis Clay.

The most halting moment of the ceremony, however, came near the end, as Bland’s fellow music legend and lifelong pal, guitarist B.B. King, rose from the pews to briefly address the audience. “If it’s possible that I see him again, I’ll have some (wise) cracks for him, which we always had whenever we met up,” said King. “Bobby, I miss you, old boy,” he added, looking toward Bland’s casket. “He was my friend.”

Robert  Bobby “Blue” Bland was buried at Memorial Park Cemetery in Memephis Tenn.

New UnSung E-Zine / Blog Launching July 4 Blues Jazz Soul


Hipster Sanctuary  E-Zine/ Blog for the Unsung  An Enclave for the Serious Music Lover of  Blues, Soul & Jazz launching July 4 2013.  Bobby Dashiki

The Hipster Sanctuary  E-Zine/Blog  is focused primarily on UNSUNG  artists of  Jazz, Blues and Soul Genres. We’ll profile, explore, interview and publicize information to, commemorate, or uplift the legacy of these artists who gave it their all during their time in the public’s eye. 

”By Any Medium Necessary”  

From time to time, we may have special events recognizing these artists as groups, or individually honoring them. We will also include individuals who contributed to the innovations and quality of the music through Press,Radio and Film. Artists emerging or still performing on a high level will be acknowledged as well.

Robert J. Carmack – Editor in Chief

Robert  grew up in Los Angeles (Watts & Compton) and has spent almost five decades in entertainment as musician, actor,producer ,writer and photo/journalist across many genres including Jazz, Soul/R&B and Blues. Co-founded The Paul Robeson Players,  Atlanta International Jazz Society,  SFBAAAM (San Francisco Bay-Area African American Musicians)worked as publicist/promoter and producer, for live concerts and awards shows. Expert in Jazz & blues history, Robert studied Music,Communications and Theater Arts in college. He holds a Bachelors of Arts Degree from California State University Dominguez Hills and is a passionate patron of  Youth in Fine Arts & Education.

We welcome ideas, suggestions,photos, and guest writers to participate as well.

Contact Us: Email  blues2jazz2003@yahoo.com    Twitter:#@blues2jazzguy

They Call Me Bobby: Sinatra of the Blues Succumbs at 83


Boby Bland   tint Blue

Los Angeles,CA._ Blues great Robert Calvin Bland, better known a Bobby “Blue” Bland, a distinguished singer who blended Southern Blues and Raw Soul while recording  big hits such as, “Turn on Your Love Light” and “Further On Up the Road,” and  “Stormy Monday” died June 23, he was 83.  Rod Bland said his father died about 5:30 p.m. Sunday due to complications from an ongoing illness at his Memphis, Tenn., home surrounded by relatives.

Bland was known in some circles as the “Lion of the Blues” and heavily influenced by Nat King Cole, often recording with lavish arrangements to accompany his smooth vocals. He even openly imitated Frank Sinatra on the “Two Steps From the Blues” album cover, standing in front of a building with a coat thrown over his shoulder. This brought about a second moniker of  “The Sinatra of the Blues.”   “He brought a certain level of class to the blues genre,” said Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell, son of legendary musician and producer Willie Mitchell.

Born in Rosemark, Tenn., he moved to nearby Memphis as a teenager and, as the Hall Of Fame noted, was “second in stature only to B.B. King as a product of Memphis’ Beale Street blues scene.”Bland was a contemporary of B.B. King’s, serving as the blues great’s valet and chauffeur at one point  early in his young career.

After a stint in the Army, he recorded with Sam Phillips at Sun Records in the early 1950s with little to show for it. It wasn’t until later that decade Bland began to find success. He scored his first No. 1 on the R&B charts with “Further On Up the Road” in 1957. Then, beginning with “I’ll Take Care of You” in early 1960, Bland released a dozen R&B hits in a row. That string included “Turn On Your Love Light” in 1961. His “I Pity the Fool” in 1961 was recorded by many rock bands, including David Bowie and Eric Clapton, who has made “Further On Up the Road” part of his repertoire.

Being one of the last of the living connections to the roots of the genre,Blues.

Bland was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1981, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.

“He’s always been the type of guy that if he could help you in any way, form or fashion, he would,” MusicObitBobbyRodd Bland said.

In the world of Soul,Blues and R&B, young singers can stand on the shoulders of true  pioneers, like Bland, who truly paved the way while doing all the heavy lifting. Bobby Blue Bland will be sorely missed with very few left to fill the void left in his absence.

Robert J. Carmack – Editor-in-Chief ** you can follow this writer on twitter:@blues2jazzguy